Each year, when it’s time to put our garden to bed for the winter, I harvest the twigs and pods the flowers have left behind and use them indoors as part of my fall decor. Because they don’t require any water, my dried arrangements aren’t limited to traditional containers. This appliqued felt “vase” works perfectly and adds a nice pop of autumn color. (Bonus: It’s just the right size to hold a quart canning jar, so you can also use it to display greenery that needs water, if you like.)

As with all my felt projects, I used WoolFelt from NationalNonwovens: Driftwood for the body and base of the vase; Burgundy, Pea Soup, and Gold for the appliques. (I also used Pea Soup for the lining.) Making this project is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle. To start, print out the patterns below and use them to cut out felt shapes in the colors you like. 

Arrange them on a 7″ by 12″ background piece, which will form the body of the vase. Be sure to leave a little extra space on the edges for the seams. Here’s what my design looked like before I sewed it all together:

When you come up with an arrangement you like, pin the felt pieces in place. Next, use matching embroidery floss and running stitch to sew the appliques in place.

When you finish the appliques, it’s time assemble the vase. Fold the appliqued felt piece in half widthwise with right sides facing and sew the pieces together with a 1/8″ seam. Cut a 4″ base from the Driftwood felt and pin it to the bottom edge of the vase. Sew the base to the vase body with a 1/8″ seam and then turn the vase right side out. To add extra stability to the vase, I cut a piece of Pea Soup felt to fit inside and sewed a seam along the short edges. To finish, I tucked the lining inside and sewed the top edges of the vase and the lining together with running stitch.

I love combination of textures and colors in this project–it looks rustic and modern at the same time. The pattern can easily be adapted to create any size or color vase you like. Just keep in mind that a felt vase is not as heavy as a glass or pottery vessel. You might want to add some glass pebbles or another vase filler to keep it standing upright.

©


Related Post